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  • Sensory Processing Disorder

     

     

      http://www.sensory-processing-disorder.com/

    A New Name

    This is the newest term for, and is used synonymously with, Sensory Integration Disorder or Sensory Integration Dysfunction.

    At this point, sensory integration is still being used to describe the theory and treatment, based on the original work of A. Jean Ayres.

    Sensory Processing Disorder is used to define and describe the disorder / dysfunction symptoms – in hopes of making this a universally accepted "medical diagnosis" – thus enabling insurance reimbursement for evaluation and treatment.

    We Receive And Perceive Sensory Input Through Sights, Sounds, Touch, Tastes, Smells And Movement.

    Difficulty taking in or interpreting this input can lead to devastating consequences in:

    • daily functioning

    • social and family relationships

    • behavioral challenges

    • regulating emotions

    • self-esteem

    • learning
       

    Ever Wonder Why Your Child Does The Things He/She Does?

     

    • Do you wonder why they are excessive risk takers – jumping and crashing into anything they can ?

    • Why they can’t do puzzles – write well – or find the coordination for riding a bike or hitting a ball?

    • Why they cry or cover their ears with every loud sound – even vacuums, toilets or hairdryers ?

    • Why they don’t like to be touched or can’t be touched enough?

    • Why they will only eat macaroni and cheese and pizza?

    • Why they will only wear certain clothes or need you to cut the tags out of their shirts?

    • Ever wonder why you can’t seem to calm them down or get them to sleep?

    • Why they won’t put their hands in anything messy or use glue, Play Doh, or play with mud?

    • Why they fear playground equipment or being tipped upside down?

    • Why crowded stores bother them so much leading to major meltdowns in public places?

     

     

    Take some time to explore this site for more of these “behaviors” and to find the reasons why this apparent “chaos” actually makes perfect sense.

    Through this site, you will finally begin to understand – or further understand, why your child does the things he/she does.

    Sensory Processing Disorder – also known as Sensory Integration Dysfunction – is still in the process of becoming widely accepted and treated by all professionals.

    Even though the theories have been around for almost four decades, much still needs to be done before the "word" has reached the millions affected by this neurological disorder.

    Now you can take this information and positively influence, understand, validate, "treat", support, and help so many children who are behaviorally and emotionally "imprisoned" by their ineffective perception and interpretation of sensory input.

    What is cyberbullying?

     

    Cyber bullying is defined as:
    threats or other offensive behavior sent online to a victim or sent or posted online about the victim for others to see. (Wolak, Mitchell, Finkelhor et al., 2006).

    • It can take the form of a message on email or IM or a social networking site from someone who is threatening to hurt you or beat you up.
    • It might be rumors posted on your profile or spread online for others to see.
    • It might be the deletion of you on a friend’s “buddy list” to make you feel left out.
    • It could be a profile made by someone pretending to be you.
    • Or, someone hacking into your profile and writing comments pretending they’re from you.

    In general, cyber bullying is bullying or harassing that happens online. Much of it is similar to what teenagers experience offline in schools, homes, or the community, but has the additional aspect of the Internet.

    Cyber bullying occurs in many different places online

    including instant messaging, social networking sites, email, and chat rooms. The most common place bullying occurs online is over instant messenger, but it also can occur via other new technologies such as text messaging and personal digital assistants (PDAs).

    Cyber bullying is defined as:
    threats or other offensive behavior sent online to a victim or sent or posted online about the victim for others to see. (Wolak, Mitchell, Finkelhor et al., 2006).

    • It can take the form of a message on email or IM or a social networking site from someone who is threatening to hurt you or beat you up.
    • It might be rumors posted on your profile or spread online for others to see.
    • It might be the deletion of you on a friend’s “buddy list” to make you feel left out.
    • It could be a profile made by someone pretending to be you.
    • Or, someone hacking into your profile and writing comments pretending they’re from you.

    In general, cyber bullying is bullying or harassing that happens online. Much of it is similar to what teenagers experience offline in schools, homes, or the community, but has the additional aspect of the Internet.

    Cyber bullying occurs in many different places online

    including instant messaging, social networking sites, email, and chat rooms. The most common place bullying occurs online is over instant messenger, but it also can occur via other new technologies such as text messaging and personal digital assistants (PDAs).

    Cyber bullying is defined as:
    threats or other offensive behavior sent online to a victim or sent or posted online about the victim for others to see. (Wolak, Mitchell, Finkelhor et al., 2006).

    • It can take the form of a message on email or IM or a social networking site from someone who is threatening to hurt you or beat you up.
    • It might be rumors posted on your profile or spread online for others to see.
    • It might be the deletion of you on a friend’s “buddy list” to make you feel left out.
    • It could be a profile made by someone pretending to be you.
    • Or, someone hacking into your profile and writing comments pretending they’re from you.

    In general, cyber bullying is bullying or harassing that happens online. Much of it is similar to what teenagers experience offline in schools, homes, or the community, but has the additional aspect of the Internet.

    Cyber bullying occurs in many different places online

    including instant messaging, social networking sites, email, and chat rooms. The most common place bullying occurs online is over instant messenger, but it also can occur via other new technologies such as text messaging and personal digital assistants (PDAs).

     Follow this link to find out more about cyberbullying and preventing it:

    http://www.cyberbully411.org/what-is-cyberbullying

    How to get a great start!!! 6th Graders take a look:)

    Signing Off for 11-12 School Year, See ya Next Year:)

    Testing and Future Happenings

    Testing will begin on Monday, May 7th and we will test every day until Friday, May 11th. Students will be testing in the morning with afternoon classes. Please make every effort to NOT shedule dentist or doctor appointments during those days if at all possible. It is very important for all kids to be tested together.

    After testing there will be two weeks of school, which will include 8th grade dance and luau and awards programs. The 8th grade Kings Island trip will be taken the Tuesday AFTER school has let out on May 29th. Please be aware of this. This date was scheduled at the BEGINNING of winter before we DID NOT miss any days:( HA! Letters will be going out soon.

    Harrison County Schools’ Anti-Bullying Hotline

    Harrison County Schools now has an Anti-Bullying Hotline. The number to call or text is 588-8081. Bullying should be reported to teachers, counselors or administrators. Sometimes students are afraid to tell an adult out of fear the bully will harm them. If you feel your child is being bullied or you as a student feel you are being bullied, call or text 588-8081 and leave a message to report the details of the situation.

    What Is Autism?

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and autism are both general terms for a group of complex disorders of brain development. These disorders are characterized, in varying degrees, by difficulties in social interaction, verbal and nonverbal communication and repetitive behaviors. They include autistic disorder, Rett syndrome, childhood disintegrative disorder, pervasive developmental disorder-not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS) and Asperger syndrome. ASD can be associated with intellectual disability, difficulties in motor coordination and attention and physical health issues such as sleep and gastrointestinal disturbances. Some persons with ASD excel in visual skills, music, math and art.

    Autism appears to have its roots in very early brain development. However, the most obvious signs of autism and symptoms of autism tend to emerge between 2 and 3 years of age. Autism Speaks continues to fund research on effective methods for earlier diagnosis, as early intervention with proven behavioral therapies can improve outcomes. Increasing autism awareness is a key aspect of this work and one in which our families and volunteers play an invaluable role. Learn more …

    http://www.autismspeaks.org/

    Top Ten Test-Taking Tips for Students


    Here are the top ten tips to success!
    1. Have a Positive Attitude
    Approach the big test as you’d approach a giant jigsaw puzzle. It might be tough, but you can do it! A positive attitude goes a long way toward success.

    2. Make a Plan
    The week before the test, ask your teacher what the test is going to cover. Is it from the textbook only? Class notes? Can you use your calculator? If you’ve been absent, talk to friends about material you may have missed. Make a list of the most important topics to be covered and use that as a guide when you study. Circle items that you know will require extra time. Be sure to plan extra time to study the most challenging topics.

    3. The Night Before
    Cramming doesn’t work. If you’ve followed a study plan, the night before the test you should do a quick review and get to bed early. Remember, your brain and body need sleep to function well, so don’t stay up late!

    4. The Morning of the Test
    Did you know that you think better when you have a full stomach? So don’t skip breakfast the morning of the test. Get to school early and do a ten-minute power study right before the test, so your brain is turned on and tuned up.

    5. Test Time
    Before the test begins, make sure you have everything you’ll need – scratch paper, extra pencils, your calculator (if you’re allowed to use it). Understand how the test is scored: Do you lose points for incorrect answers? Or is it better to make guesses when you’re not sure of the answer? Read the instructions! You want to make sure you are marking answers correctly.

    6. Manage Your Time
    Scan through the test quickly before starting. Answering the easy questions first can be a time saver and a confidence builder. Plus, it saves more time in the end for you to focus on the hard stuff.

    7. I’m Stuck!
    Those tricky problems can knock you off balance. Don’t get worried or frustrated. Reread the question to make sure you understand it, and then try to solve it the best way you know how. If you’re still stuck, circle it and move on. You can come back to it later. What if you have no idea about the answer? Review your options and make the best guess you can, but only if you don’t lose points for wrong answers.

    8. Multiple-Choice Questions
    The process of elimination can help you choose the correct answer in a multiple-choice question. Start by crossing off the answers that couldn’t be right. Then spend your time focusing on the possible correct choices before selecting your answer.

    9. Neatness Counts
    If your 4s look like 9s, it could be a problem. Be sure that your writing is legible and that you erase your mistakes. For machine-scored tests, fill in the spaces carefully.

    10. I’m Done!
    Not so fast – when you complete the last item on the test, remember that you’re not done yet. First, check the clock and go back to review your answers, making sure that you didn’t make any careless mistakes (such as putting the right answer in the wrong place or skipping a question). Spend the last remaining minutes going over the hardest problems before you turn in your test.

    Follow these test tips, and you’ll know you did your best – congratulations!

    Read more on TeacherVision: http://www.teachervision.fen.com/study-skills/teaching-methods/6390.html#ixzz1pfFjbcys

    ACT for Middle Schoolers:)

    (click on the image to take you to the website)
    Students Enrolled in Grade 6, 7, 8, or 9

    Parents of younger students may register them to take the ACT (No Writing) or ACT Plus Writing on the web only if the student is at least 13 years of age. Due to Internet privacy laws, students younger than 13 cannot register online or create a student Web account, even if their parents or guardians assist them or create their account. These students should request a registration packet or get one from a local high school. We encourage students who are at least 13 years of age to register online, but payment must be made by valid credit card.

    Future Planning:)